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Vaccinations are a very important part of our wellness program and are key to helping our pets develop the antibodies necessary to ward off diseases such as Canine Distemper and Rabies.

Rabies Canine Influenza (CIV)
Canine Distemper Canine Parainfluenza
Canine Parvovirus Canine Adenovirus Type 1 & Type 2
Canine Leptospirosis Canine Bordetella
Canine Coronavirus Canine Rattlesnake Vaccine

Many of the above vaccines are grouped into one injection for the comfort of your pet. When reviewing your pet's records you may see the following abbreviations:

    DHP - Distemper, Hepatitis (Adenovirus) & Parvovirus
    DHPP - Distemper, Hepatitis (Adenovirus), Parvovirus, & Parainfluenza
    DHLPP - Distemper, Hepatitis (Adenovirus), Leptospirosis, Parvovirus, & Parainfluenza
    CV - Coronavirus
    URV (Upper Respiratory Vaccine) - Adenovirus Type 1 & 2, Parainfluenza and Bordetella


Rabies

Of all the animal diseases, rabies is probably the most feared. The rabies virus attacks the brain and is always fatal. Most pets are exposed to rabies by the bites from wild animals particularly skunks, raccoons, bats, and foxes. The disease can be transmitted to humans through the bite or scratch of an infected pet. Vaccination of all dogs and cats is the most effective means of control. In Texas, all dogs and cats must be vaccinated after 12 weeks of age and given a booster within 12 months of the initial vaccine. All subsequent vaccines are due every 36 months.

Canine Distemper

This highly contagious viral disease is found wherever dogs are found. It affects the respiratory and nervous system and is often fatal. Primary vaccination should begin at 6 weeks of age and boosters given every 3 weeks until 16 weeks of age. Adult dogs are vaccinated 12 months after the puppy series and then every 36 months.

Canine Parvovirus

This contagious viral disease usually causes severe diarrhea and vomiting in dogs of all ages but is especially deadly in puppies. Primary vaccination should begin at 6 weeks of age and boosters given every 3 weeks until 16 weeks of age. Adult dogs are vaccinated 12 months after the puppy series and then every 36 months/3 years.

Canine Leptospirosis

This is a bacterial disease carried by many wild animals. A dog can contract the disease from infected animals or by drinking contaminated water. It can cause kidney failure and potentially can be transmitted to humans. Primary vaccination should begin at 12 weeks of age and boosters given every 3 weeks until 16 weeks of age. Adult dogs are vaccinated 12 months after the puppy series and then every 12 months.

Canine Coronavirus

Coronavirus is highly contagious and can weaken dogs by causing severe diarrhea and vomiting. The disease is sometimes confused with Parvovirus. The two diseases may occur simultaneously in which case symptoms are more severe. Primary vaccination should begin at 6 weeks of age and boosters given every 3 weeks until 16 weeks of age.

Canine Influenza (CIV)

This highly contagious, airborne virus has now been reported in San Antonio. Alarmingly, 20% of CIV infected dogs can develop a severe respiratory pneumonia resulting in a mortality rate of up to 8% overall. Some dogs infected with CIV may show no clinical signs and still spread the virus. Others may develop coughing, sneezing with nasal discharge, and fever. Primary vaccination should begin at 8 weeks of age, followed by a booster 3 weeks later. Dog should be vaccinated annually for CIV, following the initial series. For your pet’s protection, this vaccination series should be completed at least 1 week prior to your pet being exposed to a kennel or play group environment. Many San Antonio boarding and grooming facilities now require this vaccine before services are rendered.

Canine Parainfluenza

This viral respiratory disease is often partly responsible for Kennel Cough. Infection can be severe in young puppies.  Primary vaccination should begin at 6 weeks of age and boosters given every 3 weeks until 16 weeks of age. Adult dogs are vaccinated with the combination "Upper Respiratory" intranasal vaccine every 6 months after the puppy series.

Canine Adenovirus Type 1 (Canine Hepatitis) and Type 2

Type 1 infections cause hepatitis, which may lead to severe liver and kidney damage. Type 2 can be a complicating factor in Kennel Cough. Primary vaccination should begin at 6 weeks of age and boosters given every 3 weeks until 16 weeks of age. Adult dogs are vaccinated 12 months after the puppy series with the Type 1 vaccine and then every 36 months. The Type 2 is contained in the combination, intranasal "Upper Respiratory", which is given every 6 months.

Canine Bordetella

This bacterial organism is frequently involved in the Kennel Cough Complex of bacteria and viruses. It causes a tracheobronchitis resulting in a persistent hacking cough. It uses an airborne route of transmission and is highly contagious. Primary vaccination by the intranasal "Upper Respiratory" vaccine should begin at 12 weeks of age and boosters given every 6 months.

Canine Rattlesnake Vaccine (Not included in our standard vaccination protocol)

Rattlesnakes can be found where dogs live, work and play throughout Texas. We offer a vaccine designed to help reduce the overall effects of snakebite, reduce or eliminate the need for anti-venom, and decrease the need for ancillary treatments. The first year dogs are vaccinated, they should receive two doses of vaccine spaced one month apart. Dogs weighing over 100 pounds will benefit from a third dose in this initial sequence. Dogs in Texas should then receive boosters twice a each year. This vaccine dose not eliminate the need to be evaluated and treated by a veterinarian should a vaccinated dog be attacked by a rattlesnake.