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Vaccinations are a very important part of our wellness program and are key to helping our pets develop the antibodies necessary to ward off diseases such as Feline Leukemia and Rabies.

Rabies Feline Calicivirus
Feline Panleukopenia Feline Leukemia (FeLV)
Feline Rhinotracheitis Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)
Feline Pneumonitis

Many of the above vaccines are grouped into combination vaccinations for the comfort of your pet. When reviewing your pet's records you may see the following abbreviations:

    FVRCPC/FeLV/Calici - Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, Panleukopenia, Chlamydia, Feline Leukemia and Virulent-strain Calicivirus  


Rabies

Of all the animal diseases, rabies is probably the most feared. The rabies virus attacks the brain and is always fatal. Most pets are exposed to rabies by the bites from wild animals particularly skunks, raccoons, bats, and foxes. The disease can be transmitted to humans through the bite or scratch of an infected pet. Vaccination of all dogs and cats is the most effective means of control. In Texas, all dogs and cats must be vaccinated after 12 weeks of age and given a booster within 12 months of the initial vaccine. All subsequent vaccines are due every 36 months.

Feline Panleukopenia

This disease, sometimes called feline distemper, causes severe vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration. It is the most widespread disease of cats and causes high death loss especially among kittens. The disease is caused by a virus and is highly contagious. . Primary vaccination should begin at 8 weeks of age and boosters given every 3 weeks until 16 weeks of age. Adult cats are vaccinated every 12 months after the kitten series.

Feline Rhinotracheitis

This infection is a widespread respiratory disease caused by a virus. It is most severe in small kittens and can cause profuse discharge form the eyes and nose. Primary vaccination should begin at 8 weeks of age and boosters given every 3 weeks until 16 weeks of age. Adult cats are vaccinated every 12 months after the kitten series.

Feline Chlamydia Psittaci

This is a respiratory infection with symptoms resembling the feline viral Rhinotracheitis. The disease can be complicated by associated bacterial infections. Primary vaccination should begin at 8 weeks of age and boosters given every 3 weeks until 16 weeks of age. Adult cats are vaccinated every 12 months after the kitten series.

Feline Calicivirus

This infection causes a variety of symptoms including fever, excess salivation and mouth or tongue ulcers. It is usually less fatal than Rhinotracheitis or Panleukopenia. However a new strain of highly virulent Calicivirus has emerged and can cause death in little as 48 hours. Primary vaccination should begin at 8 weeks of age and boosters given every 3 weeks until 16 weeks of age. Adult cats are vaccinated every 12 months after the kitten series. Adults receiving the initial new virulent Calicivirus vaccine will require a booster in 3 weeks.

Feline Leukemia (FeLV)

This is a form of cancer in cats that is usually fatal. The disease, caused by a virus, can lead to tumors, as well as a variety of other symptoms. Infected cats often developed a compromised immune system making them susceptible to other diseases and die from associated infections. Primary vaccination should begin at 8 weeks of age and boosters given every 3 weeks until 16 weeks of age. Adult cats are vaccinated every 12 months after the kitten series.

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) - (Not included in our standard vaccination protocol)

This is a fatal viral infection that interferes with the immune system of cats and is a lifelong infection. Infected cats are unable to resist other diseases and often die from associated infections. Primary vaccination should begin at 8 weeks of age and 3 boosters given every 3 weeks. Adult cats are vaccinated 12 months after the kitten series. Adults receiving the initial FIV vaccine will require 2 boosters at 3-week intervals. A note of caution about this vaccine: When cats have been given this vaccine, they will always test positive for FIV infection on our current technology in-house blood tests. Therefore, every FIV vaccinated cat needs to have an identification microchip implanted to identify them should they ever be found by an animal control facility and subsequently test positive by the current FIV tests.  If you would like to have your feline vaccinated for FIV, please talk with your veterinarian to schedule.